The Ultimate Guide To Rickettsia Rickettsii

Rickettsia rickettsii, commonly known as R. rickettsii is a form of bacterium that is known as the primary cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

This bacterium is an obligate that is defined as an intracellular gram-negative coccobacilli that are known for containing both DNA and RNA.

The Ultimate Guide To Rickettsia Rickettsii

In this article, we have gathered everything you need to know about Rickettsia rickettsii and its various characteristics as well as what it is and how it is carried. 

What Is Rickettsia Rickettsii?

Rickettsia rickettsii is a form of bacterium and is the main causative agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, commonly referred to as RMSF. R. rickettsii is a prototypic member of the Rickettsia genus.

Rickettsia rickettsii tends to be carried by infected ticks which are then passed and transmitted through to humans when the tick attaches itself to the human and then feeds on the blood for a long period of time.

This period of time can last from as little as six hours and go right up to ten hours.

What Is The Microbiology Of R. Rickettsii?

R. rickettsii is known as being a weak gram-negative bacterium that tends to measure 0.3 to 0.7 mcm by 0.8 to 2.0 mcm and sits within the non-motile coccobacillus category.

It is only visible when exposed to special stains such as Giemsa, Gimenez, or Machiavello due to the fluorescent antibodies they contain. 

What Is The Taxonomy Of R. Rickettsii?

R. rickettsii can be found within the alpha-group of purple bacteria and is a member of the Rickettsiaceae family within the Rickettsiales order.

The Rickettsiaceae family contains various genera including the Orientia and Rickettsia. Rickettsia is known as being divided into two main groups which are spotted fever and typhus. 

R. rickettsii specifically is a prototype within the spotted fever group and is one of twelve individual pathogenic species.

However, R. rickettsii is known as closely resembling Rickettsia sibirica and Rickettsia conorii due to the 16S ribosome, while the phylogenetic relationship is less reminiscent of other species such as Rickettsia akari, Rickettsia australis, and Rickettsia belli.

Frequently Asked Questions

What Does R. Rickettsii Cause?

R. rickettsii is known as the cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever which is a bacterial disease that is spread from being bitten by an infected tick.

Most people who deal with Rocky Mountain spotted fever will suffer from fevers, headaches, and rashes which will need to be treated with antibiotics.

However, if Rocky Mountain spotted fever is not treated properly, then this can lead to all sorts of long-term problems, and in some cases, even prove to be fatal. 

Rocky Mountain spotted fever occurs when an infected tick sticks to your skin and then feeds on your blood for a long period of time between six and ten hours. This is what leads to the infection. 

What Are The Symptoms Of Rickettsia?

As mentioned above, there are certain symptoms that are highly common when experiencing Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

Due to the nature of Rickettsia being a bacterial disease, people tend to experience symptoms such as fevers, headaches, and rashes, while others have also spoken about experiencing muscular aches and pains as well.

The rashes that you may experience include papulovesicular eruptions or sparse maculopapular on your trunk and extremities. 

Is R. Rickettsii Carried By A Tick?

Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused when an infected tick sticks itself to the skin and then feeds on blood for long periods of time.

This is due to the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii, commonly known as R. rickettsii, which is primarily carried by ticks. What kind of tick carries this bacterium is dependent on where in the US you are.

For example, in the Eastern states, R. rickettsii is carried by dog ticks, while in Western states, R. rickettsii is carried by wood ticks. 

Conclusion

In conclusion, R. rickettsii is the cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever that is carried by ticks.

It is known for containing both DNA and RN and is an obligate, intracellular gram-negative coccobacilli that can cause all sorts of symptoms. 

However, it’s important to bear in mind that although there is no vaccine or known cure for Rocky Mountain spotted fever, it tends to go away naturally within a few days for most people.

If you find that you are still experiencing symptoms after a few days, and it doesn’t show signs of calming down, then you need to seek help from a medical professional as Rocky Mountain spotted fever can lead to long-term issues in the future, especially when it related to the organs.

Jennifer Dawkins

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.